From the Frozen Hinterland …

… comes a warm and loving heart all wrapped up in a happy boy by the name of Toby!

Toby

Toby

So here’s the deal … Toby is located in Minnesota, around the Twin Cities area.  The local specialty club up there —  Twin Cities Lhasa Apso Club  (TCLAC) — was approached by a vet clinic to take him on when his family couldn’t cover treatment costs for a fractured leg.  The club found a foster home, paid for his extensive treatment and now he’s ready to find a new family.

Toby is a three-year old neutered male, weighing 14-15 pounds.  More information about Toby can be found at this link:  http://www.twincitieslhasaapsoclub.org/#!adoption.  I was told by one of the club members that he’s a great little dog with no negatives … and that if she didn’t have a houseful of dogs, she’d keep him.  That’s saying quite a lot, folks!

If you have questions about Toby, the adoption process or anything else, TCLAC can be contacted at:  TCLAC2@gmail.com.  I suspect they’ll want to keep his adoption fairly “local” so keep that in mind if you’re not in the area by a 300-mile radius.

Let’s help Toby find his forever home to start out the New Year!

Show Time!!

Tibetan Apsos at Show ...

Tibetan Apsos at Show …

This is unabashedly a repeat of last year’s post (and the year before, et al )  … the same information holds true for 2013!

Once again, we’re gearing up for the largest dog show in Colorado … The Rocky Mountain Cluster to be held February 15-18 in the Hall of Education at the National Western Complex, 4655 Humboldt in Denver. The Premium List, which contains information on the show, parking, maps and entry, can be found here … Premium List.  The actual times for judging and the ring numbers are not disseminated until just a week before the show; we’ll post a link to the judging program when available.  If you’re thinking of attending, please be sure to give yourself plenty of time for parking, getting into the facility, and then finding the right ring and some chairs (rings are marked by numbers on tall poles).

Parking, depending on where one finds an open lot, can run anywhere from $5 to $10 — and it may also be a very long walk!  Entry fee to the Expo Hall is $5.  Please note that dogs not entered in the show are not allowed on the site.  If considering crowds/parking, Friday or Monday would probably be the better of the four days to attend.   As the largest show in the region, the selection of vendors and their wares is pretty amazing … if it’s dog related, you’ll find it at this show!  From art prints, to clothing, to grooming supplies, to dog beds, to canine-related jewelry, to crates and tables, it will be available.  Might want to bring the plastic along (and keep in mind that the vendors start packing up on Monday for the return home).

Besides the conformation competition, one can also find other venues such as Rally, Obedience, and Agility. These are generally held in the Events Center which fronts 47th Street; Rally is held on the 3rd floor of the main building.  Hope to see you there … it’s a great reason to come out and support the breed!  If you need more information, please feel free to contact me at:  ApsoRescue@aol.com.

A Bit Hectic …

Teller Tubby!

Teller Tubby!

… the holidays snuck up on us, ready or not. We seemed to be in the “not” category this year, although we actually have some outside decorations up thanks to a dwarf Colorado Blue Spruce near the front porch that’s perfect for stringing with white lights. Work has been nuts … last-minute guests for the long Thanksgiving weekend … and then a scramble to get errands/chores/shopping done before Christmas, i.e., meaning not much computer time in the evenings.  The new year has brought a laundry list of projects to get done (forget about resolutions).

Added to the general chaos is the new addition to the family:  Teller.  Knee deep in potty training at soon-to-be 8-months old, it does appear he’s got the concept of it down (mostly).  I taught him to “speak” several weeks ago — with the help of Frankers a/k/a “Uncle Grumpy” — and he transferred that behavior to asking to go outside.  All on his own.  We about fell off the couch the first time he barked at the back door for a potty run. WTG puppy!!!  It’s still rather novel for him so we’re encouraging him by making him “ask” to go out if he forgets an audible cue of some sort … bells, bark … something, anything!  Just as long as I know your back teeth are floating.  One byproduct of teaching him to speak is he’s vocal about asking for his food bowl … now we’re working on “quiet.”

A typical puppy, he delights in scattering toys from one end of the house to the other.  When that’s done, he starts pulling pads out of crates, articles of clothing off the hampers (hey, I was going to wear that again), and whatever else he can find to deposit throughout the house.  Then there’s always the cat to pester, keeping in mind that if one gets within two feet of him, he starts squeaking.  Note to cat:  if you don’t like the puppy that close, why do you insist on jumping the gates to be in the same area?!?!

It’s long been held that what you do today — on the first day of the year — will be repeated throughout the year.  So, we’re going to start 2013 with the “awwwww” factor.  Here’s an email I received regarding one of our former fosters, Kalsang.  Now named “Biscuit,” it appears he’s greatly enjoying his golden years:

Hi Vickie, I got your lovely card and thought I better let you know we are doing fine. I decided not to send cards this year because my arthritis has made my handwriting a mess! We are still going strong and “Biscuit” is the darling of the neighborhood when we go walking. He spends most of his time close to my side when we are home. We are so predictable, it’s funny! He doesn’t wait for me to go up to bed these days and goes on his own. Some mornings he sleeps in. We anticipate each others needs like an old married couple. He knows when he can go in the car with me and when he must stay home. His eyes are bad but he is doing very well for an old boy and the Vet thinks he’s very limber and healthy. He gets exercise chasing the squirrels in the backyard and I put peanuts out there to make it interesting. They love to tease him. Anyway, I think of you often and thank you for the joy you have brought to both of us! Merry Christmas and Happy New Year……..Mary

McKenzie

And then we have this update from McKenzie, the little one that came from a puppy mill … she’s made great progress!!

We stopped by the Lhasa website today because we saw a post about Teller. We decided that we should send you an e-mail. Kenzie is settled into a routine here. We have had 0 accidents in the house since those first couple when the home was new. Kenzie has graduated up to being able to go into the bedroom and living rooms when we are home. So she pretty much has free roam of the apartment. She’s eating well, and is not so freaked out to go outside. She has made huge strides.

We have a chair in the corner of the living room, and its back is to a window. Kenzie likes to sit on the arm of the chair and rest her head on the back of the chair and look out the window. It is adorable to see her there when I come home from school. She has a favorite toy which is an ornage dinosaur with pink felt hands and feet. She likes to chew the hands and feet. We bought her a spiky bouncy ball and she loves to play with that.

I’m currently growing out her coat, and she gets brushed about 3 times a week. I can’t stand to pet her and find a knot of hair that isn’t smooth. When I find them I have to give her a brushing. She is doing well with that. But she isn’t terribly fond of the comb that I use to work out some of the sneaky ones that get past me on first inspection.

She got to experience her first snow at Grandma Marnell’s house in Casper. We have decided that we need a blow dryer near the door because the snow just sticks like glue to her fur. We are considering booties for her feet.   She follows me to the door when I leave, but she still doesn’t come to greet us. My friend Ashley got a new puppy who we baby sit once in a while and Kenzie isn’t sure what to think of her.

Kenzie got to spend the weekend at Ashley’s house once when Tom and I had to fly out to a family wedding. She did wonderful! We are going to enroll Kenzie in an obedience class to hopefully help her gain some more self-esteem and confidence. She LOVES to go for a car ride with the window down. But she is never terribly excited to actually walk to the car. We are trying to get her out of the apartment more and more, but it is so cold here that we don’t like to be outside for very long. ><

I’ve included some of my favorite pictures of Kenzie that I’ve taken over the last month or so. We just love her to pieces. We leave her kennel door open at night and she migrates between the bed and the kennel. We’ve never had an accident or woken up to anything chewed! She likes to get on the bed in the morning and headbutt one of us for a belly rub. When she wants to play with us, she runs up to us and crouches with her tush in the air and her tail wagging and barks at us! She barks! It’s wonderful! So we play with her and chase her around the house or toss the ball for her.   We think that she is starting to feel at home.

I was watching the video of Teller and he was crying in the bath and Kenzie heard and jumped up on the couch to watch with me. I don’t think she knows why the box was making that noise but her face was adorable. Teller looks like quite a handsome little guy! We hope to see more of him in the future!

Best wishes, Liz, Tom and Kenzie!

P.s. the picture of her all wet was sent to me by Tom while I was in class. He was her outside to potty and they got caught in a downpour. I nearly laughed out loud during class. It’s such a cute photo.

Not to be left out in the snow and cold, here’s a greeting from Tori (f/k/a Lucy)

Tori

Tori

Hi there, I haven’t talked to you in a while and thought I would say hi! Tori (Lucy as you knew her) is doing wonderful…..I just want you to know we love her very much and enjoy her every day! She is so spunky and full of enthusiasm it is adorable. She plays with toys all the time, usually by herself, and she has taken a liking to sleeping with me on my bed, which I love. She is a joy to have around and we couldn’t imagine our home without her. Brody and her are bonding more every day and he is becoming much more tolerant of Tori. Anyway, she is wonderful and I just love her dearly. What a beautiful sweet doggie she is.  I’ve attached some pictures for you. Have a wonderful holiday season! ~ Abby & Jaidyn

Last, but certainly not least, we have this in about Dawa

I wanted to update you on my baby boy Dawa. He is still as sweet as can be. We found a kitten in our basement window well and he is our new pet. Dawa has been really sweet with the kitten provided that he does not see me as his mama. He still has the attitude that I am his. Still a barker but working on it. Dawa and Lilly continue to be best of friends. Lilly was a challenge with the kitten.   Hope your little ones are doing well.    ~ Emma

I honestly have to say that these are probably my best Christmas presents (shhhhhh, don’t tell Hubby).  What a grand way to start the New Year!

Sliding into Fall …

Teller …

Rescue has been a bit quiet here lately … which is a good thing when one considers the overall picture.  No strays and no dogs surrendered by their owners.  On the home front, it has been a bit hectic, however.  The end of August, I flew to Minnesota to meet up with friends, attend a four-day dog show and pick up a new puppy.  My retired champion, Dante,  sired a litter in Canada and we were there to evaluate the puppies and bring home the new little one.  Meet Apsolutely FFT Tell Me No Lies a/k/a “Teller” (yup, that’s a red Apso!).  He did just fabulous on the trip home, including sitting calmly on my lap in the airport watching the travelers go by and sleeping in his Sherpa bag during the flight with nary a peep.

Given that it’s been seven years since we had a puppy in the house, there’s been a learning curve.  Potty training is a challenge and I’ve had to refer back to my own article a time or two.  Thank heavens for belly bands and hardwood floors!  The kitchen floor by the water bowl is scrubbed daily as puppy can’t get a drink without getting his whole beard wet and trailing water through the kitchen.  Frankers has earned the nickname of “Uncle Grumpy.”  Thankfully, Teller is respectful of the old man and will back off with a correction from Frankers.  The geriatric resident — Boogins, the cat at 15.5-years old — isn’t so fortunate as the puppy is fascinated with him.

The house looks like it’s inhabited by toddlers with toys strewn from the kitchen to the bedroom and everywhere in between.  Last night Teller came flying into the front room with a bath mat in tow, shagged out of the master bath.  Other times, it’s a crate pad from the master bedroom.  And he’s certainly not above running off with whatever clothing item that hits the floor.  My last routine for the evening is gathering up all the toys and putting them back in the toy baskets … which reminds me of dusting the house.  Wait 12 hours and it looks like it’s never been done.

Grooming Teller has been … ummm … interesting to say the least.  Yeah, “interesting” is a good word.  Here’s why:

Bathtime with Teller …

Can’t say that the subsequent baths have been any less loud or any less vocal.  Just not as long!  Given that Dante was very vocal about his baths for the first couple of years, it would appear that Teller comes by it honestly.  While only 5.5-months old, Teller is quite well-traveled.  From Canada to California to Minnesota to Colorado.  He’s been through a puppy kindergarten class and has attended two conformation classes.

Fall arrived in Colorado with some fabulous color in the mountains … and decidedly colder temps.  The hard freezes have taken out the annuals and we’ll start the yard cleanup here shortly in anticipation of putting it to bed for the winter.  Have a great fall y’all!

Sammy and ‘Kenzie …

Fancy schmancy new smart phone … please excuse the bad videography lol.  Finding that one must be smarter than the phone!

Former foster, Sammy, was back for a visit; current foster, ‘Kenzie, decided he was pretty good company!  ‘Kenzie is the little one from the puppymill on the eastern plains of Colorado … look at how far she’s come out of her shell!  And being the lucky little dog that she is, she’s going to her new home tomorrow.

Hot, hot, hot!!!

Asphalt temps …

Colorado, like the majority of the country, has had miserably hot temps which arrived in early spring.  Given the weather patterns so far, I’m sure it will remain quite warm well into September.  This post is prompted by the number of people I see out walking their dogs in the afternoons here lately.  Rule of thumb, folks — if you can’t walk barefoot on the concrete or road surface due to the heat, neither should your dog!!  I did some checking and found this handy-dandy asphalt temps guide which notes that while the air temps might be tolerable, the pavement is much hotter than one would expect.

As children growing up in Colorado, my twin brother and I sustained burns on the bottom of our feet walking back from the swimming pool on an asphalt road.  We’d gone — barefoot — to the pool in the early morning and didn’t even think about the pavement being scorched on the way home.  We sustained burns severe enough that we had large, raised water blisters on the balls and heels of our feet despite the heavy callouses from running barefoot most of the summer.  Think a dog can’t sustain burns on the pads??  Think again …

If you simply must walk your dog, please do so in the early morning or late evening when the ground surfaces have had sufficient time to cool down.  And while you’re at it, don’t forget the mosquito repellent.  Living in Larimer County where we had a severe outbreak of West Nile several years ago, one must always be aware of the danger of contracting West Nile (I, personally, know four people who have had it to varying degrees).

Since we’re on the subject of hot summers, let’s not forget how quickly car temps can heat up with moderate temps … for dogs and little humans alike.

Keep it safe … keep it sane … and keep your dogs home out of the heat!

Paws on the Promenade …

This Saturday — May 19th — we’ll have a booth set up at Paws on the Promenade from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.  While we won’t have any foster dogs in attendance, we will have some fine examples of the breed … one in a puppy cut (wash ‘n wear) and one in full coat.  Our local paper, the Loveland Reporter-Herald and The Promenade Shops at Centerra joined forces and are hosting this event.  This will be our first year in attendance at this particular venue.  Hopefully, the weatherman is wrong about the 30% chance of rain for Saturday (or at least at I-25 and Hwy 34)!

Come on out and visit with us!   Click on ~~> Directions for information on how to get to The Promenade Shops at Centerra (5971 Sky Pond Drive, Loveland CO).  We’ll be set up on the main promenade across from Dick’s Sporting Goods (in the winter it’s the ice rink).

Clicking on the graphic below will open up the newspaper insert for this event …

Image

2012 Paws on the Promenade

Lucy …

… is ready to go to her new home!  Lucy — a 2.5-year old Lhasa Apso — arrived about five weeks ago, the product of a divorce in progress.  The owner, now a single mom and working long hours, made the decision to do what was best for Lucy.  And that did not include being crated for nine to twelve hours a day.

Lucy is a red/white parti-color Apso.  On the small side, she weighs about 13.5 pounds.  A very smart dog, she needs an owner that can work on training with her.  IOW, you need to be smarter than the dog!  Lucy would do best in a home where the owner was either semi-retired, retired or worked from home a good portion of the day — no children under the age of 12, please!  She gets along with other dogs and the resident feline.

She is crate trained, house trained, current on her vaccinations, tested negative for heartworms, recently had a dental, and has a micro-chip (lifetime registration of the ‘chip to the new owner is included in the adoption fee).  Lucy is a loving dog who likes to chill on the couch with her pack … or a walk is just as good.

If interested in Lucy, please contact me directly at:  ApsoRescue@aol.com.  Please note we will require an e-application, vet/personal reference checks and, finally, a home visit.

Lucy

Darkness Has Settled …

… bringing with it the frigid temps of a Colorado winter.  Fourteen inches of new snow have fallen since Thursday evening, blanketing the previously brown winter landscape.  It is late Friday night and ice crystals still float in the air … whether wind-borne from the snow cornices drooping on the roof’s edge or falling from the low grey clouds, I cannot tell.  The deepening silence and chill is fitting for contemplation and composition of tonight’s post …

Jackson ...

Jackson came to rescue in 2009, a casualty of the down turn in the economy.  His owner now worked two jobs and no longer had the time or funding to take care of him.  Giving him up was very difficult as the owner had planned to begin training to make him a therapy dog.  

Fostered by Michelle in Wellington, Jackson’s stint in rescue was a relatively short one.  Linda first met Jackson at the Fort Collins Fire Hydrant 5 where we had a rescue/breed booth set up … and where she was immediately smitten with this little dog.  Shortly thereafter, in May of 2009, Linda and Troy added Jackson to their family.  As Jackson was such a nice little dog and didn’t know the word “stranger,” Linda took on the owner’s goal and they became certified as a therapy team.  Linda later fostered Jasper for us and we got to see her and Jackson on numerous occasions as time went by.  Jackson was one of those dogs whose face exuded joy.  No matter the circumstance or the activity, he was a happy dog, his eyes a sparkle.

Linda called me from the veterinary teaching hospital at CSU on January 19th, advising that Jackson had awoke that morning, unable to walk or use his back legs.  After evaluation and diagnostics by the vets, they were of the opinion Jackson had suffered a fibrocartilaginous embolism.  While not rare per se, it is more commonly found in large dogs.  Linda wrote later:

This was harder than I thought. Jackson was put to sleep on Thursday night. He had an autopsy at CSU and then cremated. He is still sitting on our counter and I’m not sure why? Anyway it was a FCE. An embolism. A piece of spinal cord broke off, traveled through a blood vessel and went back to the spine. By the time it lodged, much of the spinal cord had blown. Meaning, the paralysis would have eventually gone to the sternum and suffocated him. There was nothing to do. Pretty rare for a small dog, but the age group was right. He was filmed by CSU through all this is and will be immortalized by teaching vets about this. I’ve attached some photos of the boy. He was truly special and we are a little lost without him. We were honestly loved by Jackson.

As pet owners, we all know that life is transient with our beloved companions.  We watch as the years tick off, collecting vignettes in time from which to draw upon for comfort when we have to let them go.  However, I don’t think any of us can steel our hearts for the untimely loss of a healthy, young dog.  Linda mentioned to me in a phone call how fitting it was that this therapy dog in life would — in death — go on to teach the healers among us.

Jackson cruisin' on the ATV

Jackson’s cremains will be interred in the family plot at some point.  For now, and for as long as it takes until that happens … he’s home.  And I know, without a doubt, that this would have been Jackson’s last Will.

Godspeed, little one.  It was an honor to have been a part of your life.

A Different Perspective on Rescue …

"It's All About Attitude" (from the exceptionally talented artist at ArgoStar.com)

I used to say I’d live in a box before I’d give up my animals, years ago before my involvement with rescue as a coordinator.  Over time, my rescue experiences have brought about a different perspective  Honestly … would living in a box be fair to my animals?  If life’s circumstances had deteriorated to the point that I’m living in a box, would I even be able to provide food or medical care for them? Would it be fair to ask them to live such a life?  Am I truly thinking of them … or my own emotional needs?

These questions come roundabout as a result of one of the “ask” forums.  Someone was asking if it would be “okay” for them to return a dog recently adopted from a shelter.  The dog’s age and size were misrepresented or misunderstood at some point in the adoption process and the new owner thought he was getting dog that would grow to be much larger.  The dog was small and was going to stay small … not what the new owner had expected or wanted.

The ensuing comments were vitriolic — to say the least — and expounded on what a bad person the poster was.  My reaction, just the opposite:  return the dog to the shelter so it could have a chance at a life with an owner who wanted a small dog and who could appreciate its many qualities.  Why doom the dog to a lifetime with someone who wasn’t happy with it from the get go?  Do we really think that shaming the owner into keeping the dog is going to change how they feel about the dog?

The flip side is that rescue would like to see every prospective owner carefully consider the impact of adding an animal to their household.  Do they have the time needed for care, training, and socialization?  Do they have the financial means to provide food and medical care?  What breed of dog is most suitable to their lifestyle and home?  Are there small children in the home?  Anyone with allergies?  Are they prepared to commit to the dog for its lifetime?

While it would be great if every dog lived out their life in one home — their forever home — I also understand that there are some circumstances beyond our control.  Surrendering an animal to rescue takes forethought and having the animal’s best interest at heart.  Yes, we still get the occasional lame excuses and, really, I don’t care when considering the big picture.  It is not my place to judge … my responsibility as rescue is to see that the surrendered dog is placed in a home that meets the dog’s needs on every level.  If someone comes up with a seriously lame excuse, then that dog really needs to be some place else!!  If their reasons for surrender are valid or beyond one’s control, then we have to recognize their efforts to do what is best for the dog when they could just drop it off at a shelter and walk away (or worse, yet).

In the end, all that truly matters is the dog and what his or her life is going to be from that point forward. 

And the little dog returned to the shelter?  While the owner was standing in line for the return, she was adopted on the spot.

Sharing …

… photos as promised!  Our latest foster, Sang-Po, has been in his new home since just before Thanksgiving.  During a marathon of should-have-been-done-before-Christmas errands done in the New Year, I finally got the new family photos taken.  Sang-Po joins BooBoo (a former foster), Kathy and Don in Loveland.  Sang-Po is a good boy, a loving boy … but definitely still a puppy and is keeping them on their toes!

Murphy, our long-legged boy

During the holiday season, I so enjoy hearing from folks who have adopted one (or two) of our former fosters.  Often times the greetings are accompanied by photos, which is of particular delight as many of our fosters came in and leave as young dogs so we get to see how they’ve matured.  The blond boy Murphy is now red gold … Elwood has lots of freckles and a new name (Leonardo) … Bubba has a new name (Max), a new canine sibling (Abby) and sports a thick, healthy coat.  The greatest gift is, however, knowing they are well loved and an integral part of the new family.  To those who shared photos, thank you, thank you, thank you!

Lou, DaVinci (f/k/a Sterling), DeLores, Piccalo, Dean and Leonard (f/k/a Elwood)

Cindy, Max (f/k/a Bubba) & Abby

It is also a time when we must reflect on these little lives, so much more temporary than our own.  Word arrived that we lost Buddy to heart failure.  He was our foster from Casper who was placed twice by the shelter in Casper … and returned twice … before landing in rescue in Loveland.  He then went on to live in Aurora with Sonya in 2006.

Gone, too, is Ms. Frisky Boots at the grand age of 16-years old.  Her elderly owner had died and the family surrendered her in 2004 when it became painfully obvious (literally) that Miss Frisky and the four-year boy in the house could not co-exist.  Having met the child, I’d have bitten him as well.  Miss Frisky had a long, full life with Roberta and Vincent in Wheat Ridge and I know they are sorely missing her.

So it is we start the New Year.  Thankful for the families who share their hearts and homes with the rescues … and tucking away memories of those special dogs who have crossed my doorstep.  Soon, very soon, I will welcome two others as they begin a new journey in rescue.  Stay tuned!

It’s All In the Numbers …

Edie -- Ambassador for the Breed

On September 18, 2011, I attended the “Bark in the “Park” expo sponsored by the Arapaho Kennel Club at the beautiful Exposition Park in Aurora.  Dante’s co-owner/breeder came down with two of her dogs who had the very important assignment of being breed ambassadors.  We couldn’t have asked for a more beautiful day in Colorado!

While there, we did an intake on a puppy being surrendered to rescue.  Notable in the fact it was a puppy — we rarely get puppies in rescue — and this marked our 40th foster dog.  Doesn’t seem like 40 fosters but it is when counting them down.  Of those 40, 37 have gone on to new homes.  Unfortunately, three of our fosters were euthanized while in foster care … two for unprovoked biting issues and one for medical issues.  That’s probably the hardest part of rescue [euthanasia]  because “rescue” isn’t supposed to end that way. 

Sang-Po ... a happy boy!

In any event, meet our newest foster … Sang-Po!!  Given a Tibetan name in homage to his ancient origins, it means “kind and gentle.”  That describes this boy to a “T”.  He’s a very loving dog and would like nothing better than to sit in one’s lap.  His ideal home would be one with a dog in residence — a dog that likes to play and is willing to put up some puppy antics.  A home where the new owner will follow through on the crate training and finish up his house training (he’s working diligently on the house training but he’s still a puppy and will need an owner that can provide routine and consistency). 

He’s still in the assessment/training phase of foster care and will not be placed in a home until the end of October.  However, we are accepting applications at this time.

Make sure you get my good side ... and my pearlies

Pure bred vs. well bred …

What exactly does that mean … “pure bred versus well bred”?  In my many years of involvement with rescue, I’ve had countless “pure bred” Apsos with “papers.”  Papers being a document saying the dog was registered with the AKC (or any of the other questionable registries which have sprung up to circumvent AKC’s DNA requirements).  However, having “papers” in hand does not mean the dogs in question were “well bred.”  “Well bred” meaning they had the qualities and characteristics that make an Apso “an Apso” … a dog possessing breed type.  “Well bred” meaning the breeder strived to produce a dog that could, on any given day, survive at altitude in its native homeland of Tibet (this link contains an excellent article on what makes a Lhasa Apso).  “Well bred” meaning the breeder could document at least five generations of dogs and the health of those dogs.  Dogs whose pedigrees reflect a multitude of champion relatives — not just one or two champions in five generations.  Dogs whose breeders stand behind what they produce for the life of the dog.

Next question is  … where does one find a well-bred dog?  Certainly not from a pet store as supplied by the puppy mills.  Or a “backyard” breeder  (“BYB”) who has thrown a couple of dogs together for a quick profit.  Despite the broad brush used by the animal rights movement to paint all breeders, the majority of show (hobby) breeders strive to produce sound, healthy dogs.  Hobby breeders cannot keep every dog they breed and maintain a breeding line — much like rescue can’t keep every dog that arrives in foster care.  These breeders often have retired champions, young adult show prospects that didn’t turn out as well as anticipated, or pet-quality puppies available for placement … well-bred dogs that need homes of their own.  And for much less than what you’d pay for a puppy produced in the mills and sold by a pet store. 

Always an advocate for rescue, I also believe in providing prospective families with options other than the petstore or BYBs.  A sad fact is 100% of my rescues have come from either pet stores or backyard breeders.  So even though one is obtaining a “rescue,” they were produced for profit with little thought given to their health and breed type. 

Remind your family and friends what breeding does: Every kitten or puppy born is a death sentence to a shelter cat or dog waiting to be adopted.

As a responsible owner and long-time rescue volunteer … I take an exception to the above statement. If not for the responsible, ethical breeders, good representations of my chosen breed would have vanished into the mists of the Himalayan mountains decades upon decades ago. It is only through the work of quality breeders that the Lhasa Apso has survived a forced flight into Nepal, Bhutan and India as well several genetic bottle necks and the invasion of the Chinese into Tibet.  
 
I have more than done my part when it comes to rescue. However, it is not by any of my actions that there are dogs and cats in shelters. Now, I am supposed to give up the breed I love … and have worked tirelessly for … because someone else was irresponsible?  That *all* breeding is bad and my only option is to accept what is coming out of the mills?  That my only choice is an ill-bred dog with a myriad of health problems?   Seriously??  Perhaps if the statement had made mention of “puppy mills,” it would go a bit further in educating the public.
 
Following is listing of well-bred dogs looking for homes of their own.  While these dogs are located in the western half of the US (or Canada), they can be flown to a new home.  In many instances, dogs can travel to other areas with exhibitors headed to shows.  Depending on location, a road trip may be in order.  Don’t like the full coat?  No problem … Apsos can also be kept clipped in a “wash-n-wear” version.  
 
Vinnie:  retired champion, on the larger size, about six-years old.  Very loving dog; great with adults, never been around children; teens would be okay.  Needy in that he wants to be right with you on the couch, etc.  Would need to be neutered.  Located in New Mexico.
 
Zach:  retired champion, almost two-years old.  Still in full coat.  Quite loving and a lap dog; enjoys sitting in the recliner with my husband and will do so for hours.  A real people dog.  Needs a home where he is an only dog or could live with a female dog.  Located in Wisconsin.
 
Big Boy —  He was 1 year on Aug. 30.  I gave him a haircut yesterday; he has a wonderful coat. His markings aren’t as red as his brothers.  I don’t think that he will be hard to housetrain as it was going good until I got sick. The brother didn’t have any accidents. He is very playful, gets along good with other dogs and kids. He is very sweet!!!  Located in Minnesota.
 
Oreo and Ready — retired champions (4-5 years old).  Fully housetrained, would be spayed/neutered prior to placement.  Oreo is very outgoing, wags her tail at everyone, never met a stranger.  Ready is more of a “got-to-get-to-know-you” type; probably do best in a home with no other males.  Located in Utah.
 
Gracie – red/white parti-color female, 10-weeks old.  Dew claws removed, dewormed, tattooed (ID), vet checked, first vaccs.  She loves to have attention and is very playful. She loves toys and actively plays with her brothers. She loves people and has had lots of interaction as she was born and raised in my family room. Located in British Columbia
 
If interested in any of these dogs, please contact me directly at:  ApsoRescue@aol.com.  Serious inquiries only … the breeders of these dogs are looking for owners that will commit for the life of the Apso.
 

Just because …

… I can. And I love this photo!!! A shot of Bella and PippyDo in their new home in Texas with friend Mazzi …

Bella & PippyDo resting after a hard day of play ...

These two bonded in foster care and, thankfully, met up with Mazzi who just had to have them both.  While I normally do not do female/female placements, these two are the exception.  And exceptionally cute … enjoy!

The house remodel continues.  Mostly at a snail’s place it seems.  While we are moved back into the kitchen, the rest of the house is yet to follow.  Appears we’ll be moving furniture in next weekend … finally!

 

Ancient Treasure …

Long a native of the Tibetan Plateau — some say thousands of years — the Apso is a relative newcomer to the Western Hemisphere.  The first Apsos arrived in the United States in 1933, a gift to C. Suydam and Helen Cutting of Hamilton Farm in Gladstone, New Jersey from the 13th Dalai Lama,Thubten Gyatso.  As part of the Newark Museum’s “Centennial Celebration of the Tibet Collection,” Nancy Plunkett of Tabu Lhasa Apsos was recently invited to the to speak on the history of the Lhasa Apso with special emphasis on the Cuttings’ contribution to the breed through Hamilton Farm.  C. Suydam Cutting of Hamilton Farm provided many of the artifacts to the museum’s extensive “Tibet Collection;” Helen Cutting was a trustee of the museum until her death in 1961.  Today’s offering explores early breed history and its foundation under the “Hamilton” prefix.  ["Prefix" denotes a specific line of dogs bred under a certain kennel name.]

Clicking on the graphic below will take you to a .pdf file of the Newark Museum presentation which can be navigated by clicking on your computer’s right arrow button (>).  If you do not have a .pdf viewer, one can be downloaded (free) at this link … Adobe Reader.

Our thanks to Nancy for sharing this rich and visually beautiful presentation.  Her historical research punctuated by the detailed photos and artwork captures the heart and soul of the breed.  Only by appreciating the past can we carry the breed forward into the future …

Lhasa Apso ... Bearded Lion Dog of Tibet

Another One Home …

Tootsie, Jane & Jerry

Tootsie had the good fortune to find her forever home in late June.  Jane and Jerry from Cheyenne made a special trip down to meet Tootsie at our rescue booth at the Fort Collins Fire Hydrant 5k … it was love at first sight!!  Ten days later, she was on her way to Cheyenne.  I have no doubt that Tootsie is loving her new home and being a part of a family.  Whether she’s ever had that in the past, we’ll never know … but it is certainly her life now.  She’s settled in and is doing quite well … and probably getting a bit spoiled, if the truth be known  lol.

You’ll note the background in the photo is a change up from our usual “family photos.”  That’s because our house is down for the count for the time being.  We’re in the midst of a home update which included taking out all the carpet and putting in hardwood throughout the house.  Between the carpet’s age, all the dogs, and the pukin’ cat, it was either replace it or go to hard surface.  We chose hard surface and haven’t looked back … most likely because there isn’t anything to look back on.  To get to hardwood, we had to completely move everything off the main floor.  With the exception of what’s in the kitchen cabinets, literally everything is either in a box in the basement or sitting in the garage, covered with a sheet.  Even my “kitchen” is in the garage, making cooking a real challenge as it’s either microwave, grill or crockpot.  Today, all the sinks in the house come out as the new counters will be installed on Monday.  Alan keeps reminding me I should be thankful we at least have one functioning sink … in the garage.     :::sigh:::    Obviously, his morning routine to get ready for work doesn’t include a sink being handy!