Of Yard Guards and Bird Dogs …

Spring has arrived here in Colorado … one day it’s almost 70 degrees and then we have a 50 degree drop in temps and snow falling.  Warmer weather brings to mind getting out in the yard, even if only a tease through February, March and April — typically our major snow months.  Like the human residents of the household, the dogs also enjoy spending more time in the yard, especially when the x-pen “snow fencing” comes down and they have run of the entire grassed area.  High on their “to-do list” is grabbing a Frisbee on the way out the door as one can always coax Dad or Mom to throw it for them.  The fact they actually bring it back and drop it at your feet certainly makes it easy to oblige their happy request.

On duty ...

On duty …

Frankers was our first “retriever” and, in later years, got to where snagging the Frisbee and then laying in the grass playing with it was more fun than having to chase it down again.  You want it … you come get it!!!  Summer days were spent checking out his pee mail and generally being lazy.  Unless you were a bird or squirrel.  Varmint visitors and nuisance birds were cause for a race across the yard to chase them from the premises.  Many years ago, he actually injured his sacroiliac joint bouncing up/down at the base of the ash tree in the corner of the yard and/ or chasing them down the fence line (the vet advised that this is an injury very common to the “treeing” breeds).  One of the reasons we put the x-pen fencing up, keeping the dogs confined to the grass areas only.  While he had a decent recovery from the initial injury with the use of anti-inflammatories and acupuncture, the injury would follow him down the years.

He was my first ever male dog.  He arrived as an 8-month old “home school” project.  I was to work on his house manners and then help find him a home.  Ali, however, had other plans.  She had been with us a year and was completely bored with the human company despite our many activities.  The bond forged between the two of them secured his place in our home.  A sweet boy.  A quirky boy.  A little old man even as a young dog.  My velcro dog, he could always be found just steps from wherever I was located.  Second to being near me, his favorite place was the yard … his self-claimed dogdom.

frankali

Tramping in the Tetons …

His passing on March 14th marks a sad milestone.  He was the last of the original “family” … Boogins, Ali and Frankers.  Memories rush in but cannot replace his quiet presence.  My second shadow.  Sleep well little one … you’ve earned your rest.

Image106 (2)

Summertime … and the livin’ is easy

Soapbox …

The following post has been making the rounds on Facebook … couldn’t have said it better myself.  And, yes, I own three dogs from responsible breeders.  Dogs who have the qualities and characteristics that make an Apso “an Apso” … something that can’t be said about the dogs coming from the mills or backyard breeders.  And, yes, I know this first hand from my work in rescue, taking in dogs that were produced in the mills and backyards.  There really is a difference …

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“Neither Of My Dogs Killed a Shelter Dog” – Our favorite Facebook status update in awhile [from Showsight magazine].

A big thanks to dog lover (and Facebook friend) Michelle Gonsalves, for this well worded commentary on “purebred dogs creating shelter dogs”. We couldn’t have said it better ourselves. Over the years there’s been a growing number of uninformed voices rallying against the wonderful LOVING world of dog shows and ANY form of dog breeding. We thank Michelle, and any other people brave enough to speak up on the subject!

“Neither Of My Dogs Killed a Shelter Dog”

A Facebook Status update by Michelle Gonsalves – Reprinted by permission.

I am NOT ashamed to be the owner of two responsibly bred dogs.  Neither of my dogs killed a shelter dog.  Neither of my dogs took a shelter dog’s home.  Neither of them added to pet overpopulation.  If I didn’t have them, I just would not have a dog.

Do you know what kills shelter dogs?  Irresponsible owners kill shelter dogs.  They kill them when they don’t do their research and add the wrong dog to the wrong household, then ditch it to die at a shelter when they can’t or don’t care to properly care for it.

Let’s not forget that in many breeds, it was responsible breeders who started their breed’s national rescue club.  Not to save their own dogs (which don’t need saving), but to save the dogs that they never bred.  To save the ones that don’t have safety nets.  Responsible breeders did that.  They did that in IGs [Italian Greyhounds].  I was interviewed more intensely to buy my two responsibly bred dogs than I ever interviewed a rescue candidate.  I had supervised visitation … multiple times.  I don’t even own them outright, they are on co-ownership, so that if anything ever happens to me they will go back to their breeder (yes, even the neutered one).

How do I know this will come to pass>  I’ve seen her do it with another of her dogs when the owner died unexpectedly.  And I saw her do it with my own dog when I nearly died myself.  No questions asked, she opened her home to him for as long as I needed her to … potentially forever, if it came to that.  Because that’s what responsible breeders do.  And trust me, I researched until I found a responsible breeder.

Added to that, I am PROUD of the responsible breeders in this country who work SO hard to preserve our wonderful breed.  Without them, the IG would be an unsound, neurotic, unhealthy creature.  Not the elegant, sweet, healthy blessing that I love so much.  Without responsible breeders, we’d never have gotten the amazing genetic health tests for enamel hypoplasia, the vonWildebrand’s test, the CDA test or the PRA test that are on their way.  Without breeders, the domestic dog would CEASE TO BE!  I do not ever want to live in a world without dogs.  What a terrible place that would be, yet so many professed animal lovers are campaigning through shaming to create just such a world.  Because that’s what it means when you say things like “adopt don’t shop,” “don’t breed while shelter dogs die,” and “people who buy dogs from breeders should be ashamed of themselves.”

What do you think will happen if we sterilize all dogs?  What do you think will happen if all breeders stop breeding?  You’d very quickly lose the rare breeds and the giant breeds FOREVER.  Wait a bit more and you’d lose important genetic diversity, causing untold suffering for dogs that have to come from increasingly small gene pools.  And then, the dog — man’s best friend — would become extinct.  Gone the way of the Dodo.  Gone forever.  So shame on YOU!  Shame on you for hating dogs!

I am not ashamed of my dogs.  I am not ashamed of their breeder, who is an amazing person who has given so much of herself for this and other breeds.  I am not ashamed of my extended family all around the world in the sport of dogs.  And I am not ashamed of myself for daring to want a responsibly bred dog that fits my lifestyle.

Blaming me for the death of shelter dogs is like blaming a parent for the death of orphans in Uganda because she chose to have a baby through pregnancy, rather than adopt one. I have never surrendered an animal in my life.  I have never caused the death of a dog in all my life.  So why don’t you focus your ire on the people who did — the people who dumped those dogs at the shelter.  They are the ones who left those dogs to die.  Not me.  Stop bashing your allies.  Stop the shaming.  We ALL need to work together for the good of dogs.  Because there are scary people out there who want your dog gone.  Who want your cat gone.  Who want the horse out of your paddock, the guide dog out of his harness, the chicken out of the coop and the cow out of the dairy.  Keep shilling their slick propaganda and shaming your fellow animal lovers and you help Animal Rights militants erase your dog from your very own home.

If anyone has a problem with that, feel free to unfriend me.

ShowTime – 2014

Tibetan Apsos at an early show …

This is, unabashedly, a repeat of last year’s post (and the year before, et al )  … the same information holds true for 2014!  And congrats to Sky, the Wire Fox Terrier, for her Best in Show (BIS) win at Westminster Kennel Club last night!

Once again, we’re gearing up for the largest dog show in Colorado … The Rocky Mountain Cluster to be held February 13-17 in the Hall of Education at the National Western Complex, 4655 Humboldt in Denver. The Premium List, which contains information on the show, parking, maps and entry, can be found here … Premium List.  The Judging Program is up so you can determine what breed is in what ring at what time.  If you’re thinking of attending, please be sure to give yourself plenty of time for parking, getting into the facility, and then finding the right ring and some chairs (rings are marked by numbers on tall poles).

Parking, depending on where one finds an open lot, can run anywhere from $5 to $10 — and it may also be a very long walk!  Entry fee to the Expo Hall is $5.  Please note that dogs not entered in the show are not allowed on the site.  If considering crowds/parking, Friday or Monday would probably be the better of the four days to attend.   As the largest show in the region, the selection of vendors and their wares is pretty amazing … if it’s dog related, you’ll find it at this show!  From art prints, to clothing, to grooming supplies, to dog beds, to canine-related jewelry, to crates and tables, it will be available.  Might want to bring the plastic along (and keep in mind that the vendors start packing up on Monday for the return home).

Besides the conformation competition, one can also find other venues such as Rally, Obedience, and Agility. These are generally held in the Events Center which fronts 47th Street; Rally is held on the 3rd floor of the main building.  Hope to see you there … it’s a great reason to come out and support the breed!  If you need more information, please feel free to contact me at:  ApsoRescue@aol.com.

Cookin’ Something Up for Rescue …

pampered-chef-logoALAC Rescue is holding an online rescue fundraiser.  As many of you know, the past year for Rescue has been difficult for the national organization with health issues that impacted Rescue’s fundraising activities.

Here’s your chance to donate to a worthy cause and stock up on kitchen essentials.  “What do rescue and the kitchen have in common?!?!?” you might ask.  Good question … and we have a great answer for you!  ALAC Rescue and one of the Pampered Chef associates have partnered up to hold an online “party.”  Order from the Pampered Chef site at the following link and the net proceeds go directly to ALAC Rescue … Pampered Chef / ALAC Rescue Fundraiser.

Love to make/bake pizza … Pampered Chef has a great pizza stone.  Cocktails … Pampered Chef has a fabulous little bar cutting board with non-slip grips.  Baking … Pampered Chef’s stoneware is top of the line.  Love salads … Pampered Chef has a handy-dandy mix-n-pour salad dressing maker.  Even comes with the recipes and measurements printed right on the side.

Cruise on over and check out the many products available.  Orders will be taken through Friday, February 14th … get yourself something special for Valentine’s Day!  Spread some of the love around!

To ensure your order is shipped directly to you:  When ordering, make sure you click so the items are shipped directly to you:  (1) Pick the item you want, it says quantity, then unit price, then total price. (2) At the end of the row for each item, there is a column that says “host” …  click on that and it drops down and says “guest” or “other.”  (3) Click on “guest” and it will send to your address.  At the end of each item, you have to do that so it is all shipped to your address.  After you update cart, your address will come up instead of the Lhasa Apso Rescue host; then hit “save shipping info” and it automatically calculates shipping for your order.

You can call Linda 412-377-8963 or email her at: Llrn57@yahoo.com if you have questions during the order process.

From the Frozen Hinterland …

… comes a warm and loving heart all wrapped up in a happy boy by the name of Toby!

Toby

Toby

So here’s the deal … Toby is located in Minnesota, around the Twin Cities area.  The local specialty club up there –  Twin Cities Lhasa Apso Club  (TCLAC) — was approached by a vet clinic to take him on when his family couldn’t cover treatment costs for a fractured leg.  The club found a foster home, paid for his extensive treatment and now he’s ready to find a new family.

Toby is a three-year old neutered male, weighing 14-15 pounds.  More information about Toby can be found at this link:  http://www.twincitieslhasaapsoclub.org/#!adoption.  I was told by one of the club members that he’s a great little dog with no negatives … and that if she didn’t have a houseful of dogs, she’d keep him.  That’s saying quite a lot, folks!

If you have questions about Toby, the adoption process or anything else, TCLAC can be contacted at:  TCLAC2@gmail.com.  I suspect they’ll want to keep his adoption fairly “local” so keep that in mind if you’re not in the area by a 300-mile radius.

Let’s help Toby find his forever home to start out the New Year!

Musings for the New Year …

Tanqueray & Tonic in hand, I wander back to the computer this snowy, cold day.  Granted not really either when compared to friends in Minnesota or Canada but, certainly cold/snowy enough.  A trip to the computer also serves as an excuse to get away from the football blaring from the TV in the front room.  A sometimes fan, today isn’t the day.   A pan of brownies is cooking in the oven to go along with the pork tenderloin, steamed broccoli and stuffing to be fixed later for dinner.  It’s been a reading-by-the-fireplace and dog weekend … Teller got brushed/bathed/trimmed Saturday; Frankers and Dante were brushed out today in anticipation of a trip to the groomer sometime in the coming week.  Hopefully when it’s warmer as I always feel bad when they have a spiffy new short ‘do and then the temps drop and the snow flies.

The time since my last posting has been hectic, to say the least.  A major surgery the third week of November, trying to keep Teller mat free during my recovery with him having a major coat blow and then getting ready for Christmas was, ummm, interesting.  Hubby informed me the surgery was karma for taking so many fosters in to get spayed … I say it was good karma for warding off some more-than-likely major problems in the future.  The three weeks off work has been dubbed my “spaycation” … hmmph, some vacation!

For the second year in a row, one of our adoptive families (Judy and Magoo) made a Christmas donation to rescue.  The only “condition” was that I write a letter to her great-granddaughter telling her what it meant to rescue and how it was used.  The back story … Judy had inquired of her grandson what the baby could use for Christmas.  He replied that the baby had more than she could possibly use and that if Great-Grandma wanted to do something, make a donation and then explain what that donation meant to the receiving organization.  The letters would be kept and read to the child when she was of an age to understand giving and sharing.  Kudos to these parents for instilling empathy and compassion early on in this child’s life … and thanks to Judy for including rescue in her holiday charity.

Best buds ... Sammy & Budha

Best buds … Sammy & Budha

We also heard over the holidays that Bubba (n/k/a Max) was doing fine and that Sammy’s family (f/k/a Wrigley) added a new Tzu named Budha.  Little red Tess in Golden continues to do well and pretty much rules the roost at that house.

Senghe … adopted in 2007 and n/k/a “Peanut” … continues to do well in his new home even with some major changes.  Here’s what his Mom has to say …

I thought you’d like to see Peanut’s big transformation today!  We had been growing him out and while he looked so adorable with his topknot (I took it out for the before photo for dramatic impression), it was obvious he is much happier with his close puppy cut.  As evidence of that he has been a complete ball of happy energy ever since I picked him up from the groomer this afternoon.  He even gets to wear his sweaters which he absolutely loves – weird, huh?  He will follow you all over the place if you have one of his sweaters in your hand and will hound you (no pun intended) until you put it on him.  He wasn’t able to wear them with his longer hair since they had a tendency to mat him up and he really hated the unmatting process!!  He also wasn’t real fond of the topknot so that was a constant battle.  Oh, well, now he will just look like a puppy all the time!

Senghe n/k/a Peanut

Senghe n/k/a Peanut

We got married this summer … Peanut absolutely loves his new dad and pretty much ignores me when Christopher is home Christopher has been awesome for him too – he is very structured and does not let that little darling get away with anything.  Peanut is his first ever dog so I’m quite surprised at his ability to handle him – I’m sure you remember that Peanut is quite the strong willed little thing.  I think Michelle would be shocked and amazed at the different little man Peanut is now.  He has learned so many new commands of which the most amazing is wait.  He will wait for quite a while even with a treat right in front of him on the floor and he waits for his dinner quietly until you tell him he can go eat.  Another cute thing he has started doing all on his own is to put himself away.  He is way too curious for his own good so he has to go into his kennel when we leave the house.  We used to tell him “kennel” and he would go in and sit down.  Now…all I have to do is grab my purse and he runs to his kennel.  I think the treat he gets when the door closes has a lot to do with it!  It is awful cute though – although sometimes I am just grabbing my purse to get something out of it and then you have to convince him you aren’t going anywhere.

Unfortunately, our little ones age right along with us and I got word that Oscar lost his battle with Cushings.  He was such a nice foster with a sweet, sweet face!  I know he is greatly missed by his family.

On the home front, Teller is being shown on a limited basis … and probably even more limited (read that “not”) until his side coat gets longer :::sigh:::.   Dante sired a litter here in Colorado in August and his two daughters (BeBe and Lily) will hit the ring sometime this spring.  Frankers is, well, Frankers and at 13.5-years old, he’s entitled to his off days.  He’s still pretty spry, all things considered, and we’ve had really good results using Dog Gone Pain (DGP) as recommended by my vet.  Definitely something to consider if you have older dogs with arthritis issues.  And while we’re on the issue of older dogs, studies have shown that it is easier to prevent joint problems than fix them after they develop.  For this reason, I start my dogs on glucosamine/chondroitin once they turn 7-years old.  We’ve had really good luck with Glyco-Flex II, a half caplet every Mon-Wed-Fri.   Don’t be put off by the price … a 90-caplet bottle will last you a year+ on a Mon-Wed-Fri schedule.  And, yes, Frankers gets the Glyco-Flex as well as the DGP.  He injured an SI joint several years ago chasing squirrels and this regimen keeps him both comfortable and mobile.

Wishing everyone the best of the coming year!  May the snows fall lightly on your winter … and may you always find a heartbeat at your feet …